Conversations with a Chiropractor

“Well, the symptoms you’re describing to me are definitely in line with whiplash associated disorder, but they should have subsided within about 4 weeks. Since you’re injury was 6 weeks ago, that tells me there are other factors at play.”

6 weeks ago I took a really lame fall skiing and cranked my neck around enough to give me a bit of whiplash. A couple of visits to the physio and my Chiropractor in the city and I figured I was sorted. The pain and tightness subsided during the aforementioned 4-week period and I was back on my way.

Last week however, my neck flared back up and throughout the day, pain and tightness wrapped its way around my neck. I’ve recently moved out into a small town, and have started seeing a nearby chiropractor (“nearby” here defined as: in the town and hour and a half away, which is still closer than the city) who treats a lot of other climbers and mountain athletes.

After a full assessment, it was determined that being a climber has predisposed me to certain strength imbalances that are lending to aggravation of my injured neck muscles. If you are a climber, maybe this sounds familiar. I know I’ve written about this before, but balance is so important to maintain in the body, I don’t feel it can be said enough.

A common issue in the climbing athletes treated by my chiro is winging scapula, formed by a strength imbalance in the trapezius muscle. Upper and mid fibre traps are over developed giving the “Helga the shot putter” look as my chiro put it. Upper fibre traps, those highly developed shoulder muscles seen on climbers, are not supposed to develop like that.  Weak lower fibre traps cause the scapula to wing away from the body when you are hanging on one arm, and instead of carrying body weight through the scapula and into the ribs (strong ring structure) force is transferred into the upper traps and into the clavicle (weak structure). This is why separated clavicles are a common injury in the climbing community.

Weak lower fibre traps combined with weak serratus anterior (another scapular stabilizer) also cause a hyper-khyphosis (exaggerated curvature of the upper spine) which means that in order to look straight forward, it’s necessary to gut the chin forward, causing a cervical hyper-lordosis (exaggerated curvature of the neck). This means that the weight of the head is forward of the neck causing strain on the small stabilizing muscle of the neck.

It’s not as easy as simply correcting posture though. After years of strength imbalance, the brain forgets how to fire the lower traps, and they must re-learn their job. Exercises that isolate the lower traps are important to correct the issues.

Once Lower traps have increased in strength, the scapula will move along the rib cage instead of winging out, meaning that the force placed on the scapula from hanging on an arm will be transferred into the strong rib cage structure instead of into smaller, weaker joints and structures.

Battling strength imbalances is a tough job, but it’s important if one wants to maintain their body for years to come. Good posture, efficient motions and maintaining proper balance in the body will help to keep joints and muscles moving the way they should.

Climb on, but try to use your lower traps properly.

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